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How to Get Pet Urine Stains Out of Clothing

Posted by Patricia Spencer on
How to Get Pet Urine Stains Out of Clothing

 

We love our pets so much that we’ll put up with a lot – their hair covering our clothing, their vomiting on our carpets, and their scratching up our furniture – and their urinating on our favorite clothing items.  Pet urine is trickier than human urine when it comes to removing both the stain and the odor, because its chemical composition is entirely different.  The smell is much stronger, and it’s often more concentrated, meaning that it can cause even more discoloration.  The key to removing a pet urine stain from clothing is to act quickly, even if the stain doesn’t look too bad, since once it oxidizes, that’s when you may notice significant damage.

Your Amazing Guide to Eliminating Pet Urine Stains Out of Your Clothes

As you’re about to find out, removing all evidence of a pet mishap can be accomplished.  And, in a lot of cases, can be done easily with supplies you have on hand as your secret weapon.

Method #1:

  1. Once you notice the pet urine stain on your clothing, remove the clothing item if you’re wearing it.
  2. Now, fill a bowl with about a cup of warm water and a teaspoon of Grab Green Liquid Dish Soap, and swish the solution with your hands to make it sudsy.
  3. Pour the mixture directly onto the stain, with the goal of fully saturating it.
  4. Right away, start blotting the stain with a paper towel, cloth or sponge, trying to remove as much excess liquid as possible. You can use a vacuum if that will help speed things up.
  5. Repeat these steps repeatedly until the stain is completely gone. Then, launder your clothing like you normally do, using your Grab Green Home Detergent Pods or Detergent Powder.

Method #2:

  1. Alternatively, you can use a mixture of baking soda, vinegar, and peroxide. Still, once again, you will need to address the stain as soon as you notice it, removing the garment if you’re wearing it.
  2. Make a solution of 1 part water and 1 part distilled white vinegar.
  3. Dip a cloth into the solution to fully saturate it, and then dab that cloth onto the stain, penetrating the fibers of the material to really saturate it. Do not rub or scrub the stain, since anything other than dabbing will work the stain deeper into the fabric’s fibers.
  4. Now, you can pour the solution directly onto the stain to saturate it further. At this point, you can go ahead and start scrubbing using a toothbrush or a laundry brush if the stain is particularly large. 
  5. Then, use a dry cloth or sponge to blot away the excess moisture.
  6. Sprinkle a thin layer of baking soda directly onto the stain, as this will both break down the stain itself and get rid of the odor, along with the vinegar.
  7. Mix a tablespoon of hydrogen peroxide and a tablespoon of dish soap together, stirring to get it evenly mixed.
  8. Next, pour that onto the stain and start scrubbing. Keep in mind that some materials can become discolored by hydrogen peroxide.  So, to be careful, look up whether or not the material and color of your garment can be treated with   If you cannot use peroxide, you can skip it and stick to straight Grab Green Liquid Dish Soap, since that, with the vinegar and baking soda can still work quite well.
  9. Scrub the stain some more, and then give it a rinsing in warm water. The stain should be gone at this point, and you can launder the garment as you normally do with your normal detergent, like with our 3 in 1 Laundry Detergent Pods, 3 in 1 Laundry Detergent Powder, Bleach Alternative Pods, or Stoneworks Laundry Detergent Pods.

For Clothing that Must Be Dry-Cleaned

If you’ve a garment that must be dry-cleaned, then we recommend contacting your local dry cleaner as soon as possible and asking them if they are equipped to deal with pet urine stains.  Most of these places know how to remove these stains.  However, if you end up with a dry cleaner who doesn’t understand that these types of stains require specialized stain removal techniques, they may end up setting the stain permanently.

A Pet’s Urine Stain Doesn’t Need to Ruin Your Clothing

While pet urine is a tough stain to fight, there are methods that can and do work, with the two above being the most effective solutions.  Again, make sure you take care of the stain as early as possible to increase the chances of successful stain removal.  Also, as a bonus tip, after taking your clothing out of the washer machine, inspect and smell those washed items before placing them into the dryer.  You see, if there’s still a stain or a nagging odor, the dryer will set it in deeper, and that’s not good at all.

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